Animex Wildlife Bridge

Tried and tested.

In association with People’s Trust for Endangered Species we have developed a tried and tested, cost effective mitigation solution for maintaining and enhancing habitat connectivity for arboreal species including Hazel Dormouse and Red Squirrel on development and infrastructure projects.

✔  TRIED AND TESTED
✔   INSTANT CONNECTIVITY
✔   COST EFFECTIVE
✔   BESPOKE & ADAPTABLE
✔   LIFETIME GUARANTEE

To find out how the Animex wildlife bridge could be utilised on your project please get in touch with one of our advisors.

"Building hedgerows, habitat corridors and dormouse bridges is critical to this species' survival!" - L. Briggs

The Research: Arboreal Wildlife Bridge to Prevent Habitat Fragmentation & Isolation

The ever-increasing global transport network has the potential to fragment and isolate habitats for arboreal wildlife, prompting the need for evidence-based, effective mitigation solutions. Although many arboreal wildlife bridges have been installed in the UK in the past, most have proven to be expensive or likely ineffective, highlighting the requirement for further research into a cost-effective and proven design. Here we explore the development of an affordable arboreal bridge that has been proven, through dedicated research, to effectively enable arboreal species such as the Red Squirrel and Hazel Dormouse to traverse fragmented habitats in both the United Kingdom and Japan. 

As presented at: National Dormouse Conference 2016 and International Conference on Ecology and Transportation 2017

Bespoke & Adaptable Design

The bridge has been designed so that it can be installed in many ways to find the most effective and pragmatic mitigation solution for each project! The bridge can be built to stand alone or retrospectively fitted into other structures such as an existing road bridge or underpass and comes with a lifetime guarantee.

Talk to a wildlife bridge advisor...

"​Improving habitat connectivity and reducing animal mortality by leveraging the natural movements of animals in their own environments."